Hair Donation 101

cut hip length natural hair

As the results of my survey continue to trickle in (please take it HERE if you haven’t yet) it is clear that you all want more hair posts around here. I’m happy to oblige. Actually decided to grow out to donate again so I figured I’d share this retro post with you in case you’re interested in donating too!


Now that my hair has almost reached hip length again, I’m ready to cut it all off to donate. In the past I donated to Locks of Love and am sending hair in to them again later this summer.

Have you donated your hair? Not sure how to go about it? Not sure if your hair even qualifies for donation?

There seems to be a lot of confusion about donating hair, whether you can have colored hair, curly hair, grey hair etc. So I’ve consolidated a little bit of information using the FAQs.

Here’s the scoop:

How do I donate my hair?

  1. Grow your hair out (have 8-12 cuttable inches in good condition)
  2. Wash and dry your hair
  3. Put it in a ponytail and chop it off! (or have it chopped off for you)
  4. Choose your charity and fill out the donation form
  5. Send your hair to the charity
  6. Feel awesome about your new short ‘do and your good deed 🙂

Where can I donate my hair?

Here are a few of the popular places you can send your hair to:

Who can cut my hair for me?

You can go to your favorite stylist, or search for donation events in your area. Some salons and chain salons offer discounted cuts to people donating their hair, so that’s an option too. I prefer to go to my favorite stylist Mike at Studio Mohair to chop off the length and then give me a cute short ‘do.  But honestly, you can cut it on your own if you wanted to. Just make sure your hair is clean, in a ponytail and snip away!

What do I get for donating my hair?

I always find it funny when people ask me what I got when I donated it. My standard answer used to be “shorter hair” but my new answer will be “satisfaction.” However if you want to receive a thank you card, you can request one when you send your hair in. Even though you’re not really chopping off all of your hair for a thank you card, it’s nice to know it has definitely been received.

What kind of hair can be donated?

Hair in GOOD condition is required of all charities. Curly, Straight, Wavy, Kinky, it’s all good. For all charities the hair must be clean, dry, and in a ponytail or braid (so the strands are all facing the same way) Here are the requirements for each charity:

Locks of Love:

  • YES: Virgin hair, Permed, Color Treated, Grey*, Curly
  • NO: Bleached

*note: grey hair, and hair shorter than 10 inches is SOLD to offset costs, not put into wigs.

Wigs for Kids:

  • YES: Virgin hair, Grey hair
  • NO: Color Treated, Bleached, Permed,

Pantene Beautiful Lengths:

  • YES: Virgin Hair, 5% or less Gray hair
  • NO: Color Treated, Bleached, Permed, Chemically altered, Grey

Children with Hair Loss:

  • YES: Virgin Hair, Non-Chemically Treated Hair is PREFERRED, Grey Hair
  • NO: Chemically Damaged, otherwise, they accept it all 🙂

How long does my hair have to be to donate?

Here are the length requirements for each organization:

  • Locks of Love: 10 inch minimum (Layered hair OK if longest layer is 10 inches, the shorter layers will be SOLD)
  • Wigs for Kids: 12 inch minimum (no maximum)
  • Pantene Beautiful Lengths: 8 inch minimum (no maximum)
  • Children with Hair Loss: 8 inch minimum (no maximum)

I hope this helps you make a decision on which organization will receive your hair.

I’m starting a series on Youtube to chronicle my hair’s growing process and teach you how to grow yours long enough to donate (or not donate) as well. Subscribe to my channel here. Good luck and happy hair growing!

Have you ever considered donating your hair?

Are you currently growing it out to donate?

Braidouts, Purple Hair, Big Chop and Clear

clear hair post


I have been wearing my hair in a bun or ponytail for the last 8 months. Since I started my job when I moved to Florida, I have been pulling my hair back from Monday to Friday. Then on the weekends I’d just wear a wash n go. Now that I’m home, I’m wearing a wash n go more often, but I finally stopped being lazy and did my first braidout in a long time. My last braidout was done before I chopped all my hair off to donate. That was 2013. So I put some coconut oil on my hair and braided it up after washing and conditioning with Clear Intense Hydration shampoo and conditioner. I rolled the ends on satin rollers since they would unravel if I didn’t. Then I let it air dry. It dried overnight. I used a satin scarf to protect it from getting messy in bed. Here are my results! Me likey!




I’m dying my hair purple. Yep. I said it. I’m doing it. Now that I’ve left corporate america (for the LAST time) I am free to look how I wanna. I’m getting a tattoo that’ll be visible when clothed, and I’m getting funky hair color. Not sure if I want to do my whole head, or just the front, leaving the back black… I guess I’ll see and decide after I BC.   As it stands My hair is about 75% natural with the rest scraggly  permed ends. I’m ready to chop the straight parts off. Not sure if I’ll go it alone or head to a stylist to cut and shape it for me. (Maybe both?) But, once I BC I’ll be heading to a stylist to get my purple on. I’ll have to take super good care of my hair once I go purple. I’ll first have to go even blonder, then put the purple on top. That’s a lot of damage.  

Have you had a funky hair color before?


Do you use those little samples of lotion or shampoo that come in the mail? I’ve been using CLEAR SCALP & HAIR™ Intense Hydration Shampoo and Conditioner (and have John using it too) since I got a random sample packet in the mail a few years ago.  I usually hold on to those samples for a while before trying them or tossing them out during one of my seasonal purges.   I’m glad this one made the cut. It’s all about keeping your hair and scalp healthy!   John has used this brand more than any other for the past few years. He has “normal” hair. Doesn’t dry out easily, but doesn’t get too greasy when dirty either. I envy him that. My hair gets dry just for GP. Add to that now my whole blonde coloring…. I would have some serious breakage and damage issues if I let my natural dryness + colored fragility go without taking steps to keep my scalp and hair healthy.  


For me, this means…keeping my scalp clean and lots and lots of conditioning and moisturizing. The Clear shampoo is great for me because it cleanses without making my hair feel stripped or “squeaky” clean. I use the conditioner to keep my curls popping and dryness at bay. The conditioner is great for me because even though it’s creamy, moisturizing and gives my hair slip, it isn’t a pain when it comes to the rinse. After rinsing it out my hair doesn’t feel coated at all, it’s just moisturized, feeling strong and my curls are nice and springy. 



    Have you tried CLEAR yet?

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I was selected for this opportunity as a member of Clever Girls and the content and opinions expressed here are all my own.

Curly Kids – Biracial Hair Care Tips (#curlykids)

how to care for curly biracial hair

When I’m out with Ro and/or Kai I’m often stopped by moms of biracial kids and asked about their hair. Almost every time I post a pic on Instagram of Kaya I get messages with questions about hair care strategies.

This post is long overdue.

Here are my curly biracial hair care tips, tools, products and tricks for growing a healthy head of hair on your curly headed child.

I’m not a professional stylist, but I am a woman who knows about natural healthy hair care, so I’m using what works for me.

My number one tip: Less is more. Keep it simple. Shampoo/Conditioner/Moisturize/Style. No need for curl enhancing smoothies, and gels…. they’re BABIES! Keep it simple and their hair will grow healthy and long if that’s your goal.


So that said. Here’s my approach. I hope some of it helps you out:


John’s hair is thick but bone straight, with barely a wave to it. My hair is dense, super curly/wavy, very dry and super course. Biracial hair runs the gammut from very dense/curly/course, to very straight/silky/smooth. We had no idea what head of hair our children would end up having.

Rohan’s hair is curly, and when it’s long it forms ringlets. I let it grow for about two years before I started trimming it a bit. Now I cut it every month and keep it low, but it still curls up. His curls are loose and he also has a bit of a wavey thing going on. He has a patch of hair in the back that is kinky and very course and doesn’t curl much. It’s drier than the rest of his hair as well.

Kaya’s hair is curlier than Rohan’s. Her hair curls into corkscrews in some places and is tightly waved in other places. She also has a thicker, tighter coiled section in the back of her head.



John would shampoo Rohan’s hair (with standard baby shampoo) and wonder why it was so dry, his lil back hair patch turning straw-like.  My aunts would wash, condition and then grease up the children’s hair so much it would drip like jerry curl!

Both sides of his family were treating the hair the same way they do their own. I had to explain to both John and my aunts that we can’t treat our mixed kids hair the way we treat ours. No two heads of hair are exactly the same, and while one mixed kid’s hair could be silky and smooth, another’s can be super course. You have to treat them accordingly.


I do not shampoo the children’s hair very often. I will shampoo Rohan about once every two weeks. He gets conditioned almost daily in the bath. Some days I will just use water and my finger tips to gently wash his scalp and then use a conditioner as a co-wash.

When I do shampoo, I use a gentle shampoo that is organic, paraben free, sulfate free and is as “clean” as possible. (I will list some faves in the products section of this post)


Kaya I will shampoo weekly. I use more oil/moisturizing products on her hair due to it’s texture and dryness level, so I shampoo her more frequently to avoid any build up from those products.

To shampoo the babies’ hair I thoroughly wet the hair and scalp, and use a small amount of shampoo, and my fingertips (not nails) to rub in quick circles around the scalp. I focus my energy on cleaning the scalp and the roots of the hair. I never take the length of their hair and scrub it. The shampoo will rinse down the length of the hair sufficiently cleaning it. I use warm water to rinse away all of the shampoo from the scalp. You can take a white washcloth or towel and wipe the scalp a bit to ensure you got all of the residue up if you’re not sure.

Even if I am not washing their hair, the kids do get their hair wet in the bath every day with a little bit of a scalp massaging at the very least. I just call it a water-wash. 🙂


I use conditioner in two ways. As a co-wash, as mentioned above, and in the traditional way after a shampooing.

A co-wash is simply using the conditioner the same way you’d use shampoo. When I co-wash, I don’t focus so intently on the scalp. I smooth the conditioner along the entire length of the hair, and then I use my finger tips to wash the scalp and then let the water rinse the hair clean.

When conditioning the traditional way, I quickly towel dry the hair a bit, (by squeezing w/ the towel, not rubbing) and then apply conditioner being careful to ensure all the strands are saturated. I’ll let the conditioner stay on while I bathe the kids or let them play in the tub a while before rinsing thoroughly. Again, a white washcloth or towel rubbed on the scalp can be used as a test to ensure all the product has been rinsed off. We don’t want build up on their little scalps. IMG_6132

Daily Care

After the hair is cleansed and conditioned, I put on some type of oil or moisturizing product. For Rohan, his hair is so fine that anything weighs it down and makes it look like he’s letting his Soul Glo.


So I just put a small amount of coconut oil on my hands, rub my hands together and then run my hands through his hair. I pay special attention to the course patch in the back.

For Kaya, I may use a moisturizing product either a leave in spray or cream, but most often use coconut oil for her as well. Her hair is thicker, drier and can handle more than Rohan’s so I apply coconut oil a bit more liberally with her.

The daily care for their hair consists of:

  • Gently detangling (with a comb like this)
  • Rewetting to “neaten up” curls if needed (For Ro)
  • Twisting or Ponytailing (For Kai)
  • Reapplying moisturizer or coconut oil if needed

Nightly Care

As of right now I don’t have a nightly routine for their hair, but Kaya’s hair is growing quickly and she’ll soon wear a scarf or bonnet to sleep in just like her mama.

If your child is a wild sleeper and a bonnet or scarf will easily slide off in the night, I suggest a satin pillowcase to sleep on. (I sleep on a satin pillow case, and have my scarf/bonnet on as well each night)


I finger style Rohan’s hair and it immediately does whatever it wants to do anyway. Once the south Florida humidy hits it, it all curls up tight against his head.

I cut his hair on my own. Using clippers at 1.25” on the back and sides, and then using scissors for trimming the top.

Kaya hasn’t had a trim yet, and she likely wont for a few more years. On Kaya I will attempt a ponytail or twists, but she immediately rips them out. I try a bow, she pulls it out and throws it at me. So, for now, she wears her hair out about 90% of the time. If I can slip on a headband and distract her immediately, I can sometimes get her to wear that for a bit.


Once in a while she’ll let a ponytail or pigtails stay in. And if I twist her hair up after a bath at night time she will be so relaxed she wont yank at them… but she’ll go to bed and wake up with a mess anyway.

Because her hair is soft and her curls a bit looser, I would have to put a barrette at the end of her braids/twists in order to get them to stay put. Otherwise, they unravel about 25% up the twist almost immediately. Since taking care of the ends of your hair is so important for length retention, I just avoid that. If they unravel, I let them be.


Styling Tips:

  • If hair is tangled use a detangling spray and fingers (or a wide tooth comb if needed) to gently detangle from the ends of hair up to the top.
  • Don’t pull the hair back tightly in any style
  • If your child’s hairline is course/curly/curls up, you can use water and oil and gently brush the hair down and let it “set” with that. Avoid gels and brushing harshly at the hairline
  • Avoid elastics and barrettes that have sharp/scratchy parts on them or anything that will pull at the hair
  • Avoid any accessory that is heavy, we don’t want to weigh the baby’s head down or pull at their gentle strands.


These are the products I have personally used on Rohan and Kaya and will continue to use.







There are some product lines I have found that I have not yet tried on my children, but you may want to look into them:

I’m going to try the Mixed Chicks Kids line eventually because I use them on my hair and I love it.

I hope that was helpful for you.

This is just how I do things. Every mama is different, as is their child. Here are some mamas I know that are doing a great job with their biracial children’s hair. Check em out when you have a sec: Alisha at CoilyLocks, Jenn at BabyMakingMachine and Stacy Ann at WeatherAnchorMama.

If you know any other bloggers or sites posting about hair care for mixed kids, biracial – primarily those mixed with Black, leave links below, I’d love to check em out.



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Short Hair Problems: 4 Reasons Why My Short Natural Haircut is Ruining My Life

picked out fro

Picked out Afro – Look, even the baby is worried about me! (Don’t ask what I’m doing with my face, I couldn’t tell you)

I shouldn’t have cut my hair.

Yeah. I said it.

I don’t exactly miss my longer hair in itself…but now I’ve got all these Short Hair Problems that I never knew would come my way. My haircut is ruining my life.

Short hair isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. Yeah the fade was cute for a minute, and yeah the color was a nice little change… but this short natural haircut is ruining my life and here’s why:

1. I’m not an exotical sex symbol anymore!

It’s a dark time in my life. I walk down the street and I don’t get accosted with “yo mami” or “Trini! Trini!”… I get no lip lickin’, no grunts of appreciation. Nobody thinks I’m some mysterious “other” race. Now I’m just boring ol’ African American. Yawn. And what’s worse…I get “Excuse me miss.” “A moment of your time, sis.” And once when I was with my son I got a ma’am. If a man tips his hat to me and says “g’day” in lieu of sneaking a peek at my rear and biting his lip, I may just slit my wrists.

2. I have to actually maintain this damn cut!

I’m used to letting my hair just be. Wild and free. It grew out at whatever pace it wanted to. I didn’t bother it, it didn’t bother me. Now, I blink and my hairline is black while the rest of my hair is light brown. I blink again and a fade is now an afro. I cut this hair to make less work for myself, not more. Now I’ve gotta go….to a salon….and get….shape ups….every…month!? No no…this is not going to work for me. Too much maintenance! What does this haircut think I am?! Responsible?

3. I can’t feed my PJism!

I’m a proud PJ. (Product Junkie) But now, I’ve got two cabinets chock full of products, and no hair to use them on. It will take me a lifetime to finish these items up. With my hair short, I cannot justify purchasing all the new products I see advertised. I’ve been using the same conditioner since the day I got my hair cut, over a month ago now, and the bottle is practically still full! I can’t go on like this. My husband LOVES this one, mind you. He did a fist pump when I mentioned not being able to buy more hair products.  A FIST PUMP! wtf?

Speaking of my husband….

4. Storming away is boring and useless!

I can no longer end fights. How the hell am I supposed to make a dramatic exit from an argument if I’ve got no hair to whip around in his face as I turn to storm away? I can’t! There’s no flair! If I’m going to maintain my status as the drama queen in this marriage I’ll need to make deliciously diva-like exits. Especially at that point in the argument when I realize I’m actually wrong. I need that dramatic storm-away! What am I supposed to do with this short hair cut? Say things like “ok baby, let’s agree to disagree” and turn to calmly walk away?! No…that just won’t do at all.

So there you have it. My short natural hair cut is ruining my life. I’m now a respectable looking African American woman who’s responsible, frugal, and reasonable in arguments.

Thanks a lot, hair cut!

::sigh:: I need a weave.


**I’m just playin. I am loving this short cut!**